Thursday, 24 May 2018

Heritage Apple Trees

THE APPLE TREES WE PLANTED AT BALLYQUINTIN ARE NOW ALMOST FIVE YEARS OLD. WE REVISITED THE SITE ON WEDNESDAY, 23RD MAY, 2018.

HERE IS THE ORIGINAL POST FROM 2013.

I spent today at Bar Hall, a property of the National Trust close to Ballyquintin Point, on the Ards Peninsula, County Down.

We all met at the old Mount Stewart estate schoolhouse, from where the trucks were loaded with spades, stakes, mulch sheeting and, of course apple saplings.


We have established a new orchard at the side of a sheltered field near the entrance to Ballyquintin Farm.

The little apple-tree saplings are not ordinary ones. They are heritage varieties, including Bloody Butcher, Lady's Finger of Offaly, Ballyvaughan, Ballyfatten, Ross Nonpareil, Widow's Friend, and Kemp.

Eighteen saplings were planted and they cost about £200.


Therefore, unsurprisingly, we devoted the day to planning the layout, planting at appropriate distances, ensuring that no same varieties were planted together; and stakes were hammered in at a 45-degree angle.

There was fresh manure in the field, which we put to good use.

The mulch sheets will protect the little trees from long grass and weeds, thereby fostering growth and providing them with the best chance of flourishing.

Published in November, 2013.

Milford House

THE McCRUMS OWNED 46 ACRES OF LAND IN COUNTY ARMAGH

WILLIAM McCRUM (1785-1879), son of William McCrum (1756-1818, a farmer from County Armagh, by his wife, Elizabeth Harper, of County Armagh), married, in 1818, Judith, daughter of Moses Paul, and had issue,
ROBERT GARMANY, of whom presently;
Martha, died in infancy.
The only son,

ROBERT GARMANY McCRUM JP DL (1827-1915), of Milford House, County Armagh, High Sheriff of County Armagh, 1909, wedded, in 1864, Anne Eliza Riddall, of Armagh, and had issue,
WILLIAM, his heir;
HARRIETTE, b 1867.
Mr McCrum was succeeded by his only son,

WILLIAM McCRUM (1865-1932), of Milford House, High Sheriff of County Armagh, 1888, who espoused, in 1891, Maude Mary, daughter of Dr W W Squires, of Montreal, Canada, and had issue, an only son,

CECIL ROBERT McCRUM OBE* (1892-1976), of The Mall, Armagh, Captain, Royal Navy, who wedded Ivy Hilda Constance (1891–1990), daughter of William Nicholson, and had issue,
Patrick, 1917-22;
Antony, b 1919; 
MICHAEL WILLIAM, of whom presently;
Robert.
The third son,

MICHAEL WILLIAM McCRUM CBE (1924-2005), a distinguished academic and historian, married, in 1952, Christine Mary Kathleen, daughter of Sir Arthur Brownlow Frederick fforde GBE,  and had four children, of whom 

(John) Robert McCrum, born in 1953, is a well-known editor and writer.

Robert Garmany McCrum's only daughter,

HARRIETTE (1867-1951), of The Mall, Armagh, married, in 1898, the Rev David Miller, and had issue, four sons,
Robert Craig;
William McCrum;
David Riddall;
Edward Wentworth.
*Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood, St James's Palace, SWl. 1st January, 1943: The KING has been graciously pleased to give orders for the following to be Additional Officers of the Military Division of the said Most Excellent Order : Captain Cecil Robert McCrum, RN (Ret.).


MILFORD HOUSE, near Armagh City, County Armagh, is a two-storey, Italianate country house, built for Robert Garmany McCrum between 1865-1904.

It has a three-sided bow; pedimented three-bay projection; and camber-headed windows.


There is an elaborate range of glasshouses running at right-angles from the middle of the front.

During the Victorian era, the grounds extended to 46 acres.

The manor house passed into the ownership of William McCrum in 1915.

Never adept at business, he lost heavily in the Wall Street Crash of 1929 and was forced to auction the contents of the house the following year and sell the mill the year after that.

Mr McCrum died penniless in 1932 and the Milford House came into the ownership of the Northern Bank.

In 1936, the bank leased it to a private boarding school for girls (Manor House School), who bought it outright for £3,000 in 1940.

The school closed in 1965; and in 1966 the property was sold to the Northern Ireland Hospital Authority for use as a special care home.

This shut in 1988 and since then the property became vacant.

In 1936, the house was leased and ultimately sold to a girls' school.


In 2000, the Friends of Manor House was established by Stephen McManus in collaboration with Armagh Council to secure the future of the property.


The building was sold to the current owners in 2002.

The Milford Buildings Preservation Trust continues to work tirelessly to protect Milford House, its parkland and gardens.

First published in May, 2014.

Wednesday, 23 May 2018

Dunsandle House

THE BARONS DUNSANDLE AND CLANCONAL WERE MAJOR LANDOWNERS IN COUNTY GALWAY, WITH 33,543 ACRES
The family of DALY, or O'DALY, is of very ancient origin, deducing its descent from Niall of the Nine Hostages, monarch of Ireland in the 4th century, who was also common ancestor of the O'NEILLS of Tyrone and O'DONNELLS of Tyrconnell, from whom the pedigree of this family is lineally traced in the Heralds' office.
THE RT HON DENIS DALY (c1638-1721), son of James Daly, of Carrownakelly, by his wife, Anastase D'Arcy (niece of Patrick D'Arcy), had a son,

DENIS DALY, of Carrownakelly, whose son,

JAMES DALY (1716-69), MP for Athenry, 1741-68, MP for the borough of Galway, 1768-9, married firstly, Bridget, daughter of Francis, 14th Baron Athenry; and secondly, Catherine, daughter of Sir Ralph Gore Bt, by whom he had issue,
St George;
DENIS, of whom we treat.
The younger son,

THE RT HON DENIS DALY (1748-91), of Dunsandle, County Galway, married, in 1780, the Lady Henrietta Maxwell, daughter of Robert, 1st Earl of Farnham, and had issue,
JAMES, his heir;
Robert (Rt Rev), Lord Bishop of Cashel and Waterford;
Henrietta; Katharine; Charlotte; Elizabeth; Emily; Mary.
Mr Daly was succeeded by his eldest son,

JAMES DALY (1782-1847), MP for County Galway, 1812-27, who was elevated to the peerage, in 1845, as BARON DUNSANDLE AND CLANCONAL, of Dunsandle, County Galway.

His lordship  married, in 1808, Maria Elizabeth, second daughter and co-heiress of Rt Hon Sir Skeffington Smyth Bt, MP, of Tinny Park, County Wicklow, and had issue,
DENIS ST GEORGE, his successor;
Charles Anthony;
SKEFFINGTON JAMES, 3rd Baron;
Bowes Richard;
Robert;
Margaret Eleanor; Rosa Gertrude Harriet.
His lordship was succeeded by his eldest son,

DENIS ST GEORGE, 2nd Baron, a captain in the 7th Dragoons, wedded, in 1864, Mary, daughter of William Broderick, though dying without issue, the family honours devolved upon his next brother,

SKEFFINGTON JAMES, 3rd Baron (1810-93), who died unmarried, when the family honours reverted to his cousin,

JAMES FREDERICK, 4th Baron (son of the Hon Robert Daly, youngest son of the 1st Baron), Assistant Private Secretary to Lord Beaconsfield, 1874-80, Private Secretary to the First Lord of the Treasury, 1885-87, Assistant in the National Debt Office, 1888.

On the death of the 4th Baron, in 1911, the titles became extinct.


DUNSANDLE HOUSE, near Athenry, County Galway, was a five-bay, three-storey country house, built ca 1780, now in ruins and roofless.

It was said to have been the finest house in the county, famed for its neo-classical plasterwork.  Various visitors commented that it had a good cellar and a fine library.

The basement housed some of the servants, the money room, and the boiler. On the ground floor were the drawing room, the bathrooms, the function room and one of the sitting rooms.

There was also a spacious hallway which led into a highly decorative interior with neo-classical plasterwork.

Photo credit: Eamonn McNally

The second floor had more sitting rooms, several bedrooms and a very large bath, and the attic was used for storage and for water tanks.

According to The Buildings of Ireland,
Although ruinous, the high quality of construction employed in this country house is clearly evident. String courses, cornice and window surrounds are the work of skilled stonecutters and masons. The associated outbuildings and the fine entrance archway enhance the house. The detailing hints at the formerly splendid architectural quality that has been lost in the ruination of Dunsandle House.
The centre block had three storeys over a basement with five-bay entrance and garden fronts, each with a three-bay pedimented breakfront; joined by long, straight screen walls with pedimented doorways and niches to low and wide-spreading two-storey wings.

The saloon had elaborate plasterwork; a coved rococo ceiling in the morning-room; Adamesque ceiling in the drawing-room.


Dunsandle was sold by Major Bowes Daly MC, grandson of the 2nd Lord Dunsandle, about 1954. Major Daly was aide-de-camp to the Viceroy of India, and Master of the Galway Blazers.

 A reader has provided me with more information:
Major Bowes Daly divorced his first wife Diane Lascelles to marry a divorcee Mrs Hanbury (whose first husband Guy Trundle had an affair with Wallis Simpson). This created a scandal in Country Galway on a par with the abdication crisis of 1936!

Major Daly was the last of his family to reside at Dunsandle House and the furore over his re-marriage led to the Catholic clergy boycotting the Galway Blazers of which he was Master. He sold up in 1954 and the house was later demolished.

After going to East Africa he returned to Ireland and lived his last years on Lord Harrington`s estate in Co. Limerick. He is buried in Loughrea near his former home. 
The Irish land commission demolished parts of Dunsandle House and sold all the valuable parts of the house in 1958.

They divided the land of the estate between the local farmers.

Dunsandle arms courtesy of European Heraldry.  First published in December, 2011.

Tuesday, 22 May 2018

Agnew of Kilwaughter

THE AGNEWS WERE MAJOR LANDOWNERS IN COUNTY ANTRIM, WITH 9,770 ACRES


PATRICK AGNEW, of Lochnaw, Wigtownshire, said to be a kinsman of the Agnew Baronets, Collector of Rents for the Earl of Antrim, married, in 1622, Janet Shaw, and built a castle at Kilwaughter, County Antrim.

Mr Agnew was succeeded by his son,

JOHN AGNEW, who wedded his cousin, Eleanor Shaw, and was succeeded by his son,

PATRICK AGNEW, who married and purchased the remaining lands at Kilwaughter which, until 1660, had been in the possession of the Agnews of Lochnaw:
Sir Patrick Agnew, 1st Baronet, 8th Hereditary Sheriff of Galloway, father of Colonel Alexander Agnew, of Whitehills, who, with Andrew Agnew, his brother, afterwards the 9th Sheriff, was frequently in Ulster.
Mr Agnew, High Sheriff of County Antrim, 1669, was succeeded by his son,

PATRICK AGNEW, who married and had issue,
PATRICK, of whom we treat;
Margaret, m James Crawford;
Jean, m Robert Blair, of Blairmount;
Helen, m James Stewart.
Mr Agnew died in 1724, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

PATRICK AGNEW, who espoused Martha Houston (or Houseton) and had issue,
WILLIAM, of whom we treat;
Frances;
John;
James (?);
Patrick (?);
Henry;
Hugh (?).
The eldest son,

WILLIAM "SQUIRE" AGNEW, High Sheriff of County Antrim, 1744, married his cousin, Margaret Stewart, of Killymoon Castle, Cookstown, County Tyrone, and had issue,
James, died unmarried;
William, died unmarried;
MARIA, of whom we treat;
Jane, m Henry Shaw, later of Ballygally.
MARIA AGNEW wedded firstly, James Ross; and secondly, Valentine Jones, by whom she had issue, one son, Edward; and a daughter, Margaret.

Her only son,

EDWARD JONES (1767-1834), High Sheriff of County Antrim, 1803, succeeded his grandfather and assumed the additional surname of AGNEW.

He married Eleanor Galbraith and had issue,
William, born in 1824; succeeded though died unmarried;
Maria, m T C Simon Esq.
William Agnew was succeeded in the Kilwaughter estate by his niece,

(MARIA) AUGUSTA, COUNTESS BALZANI (1847-95), only child of Thomas Collins Simon and Maria (Agnew) Simon.

Countess Balzani died in 1895, leaving two daughters,
Gendoluni, Madame Valensin;
Nora.
First published in June, 2016.

The Langham Baronets

 THE LANGHAM BARONETCY WAS CREATED IN 1660 FOR SIR JOHN LANGHAM, KNIGHT

This family is descended from

WILLIAM, son of Henry de Langham, who held land in Langham, Rutland, during the reign of EDWARD I.

The fourteenth in lineal descent from him was

ALDERMAN SIR JOHN LANGHAM (1584-1671), Knight, Sheriff of London, 1642, who was created a baronet in 1660, denominated of Cottesbrooke, Northamptonshire, as a recompense for his sufferings in the royal cause (having been twice committed to the Tower, with the Lord Mayor and other aldermen, for refusing to publish an act for the abolition of royalty).

Sir John, who acquired a large fortune as a turkey merchant, represented the City of London in parliament in 1654, and the borough of Southwark, 1660.

He married Mary, daughter of James Bunce, and was succeeded at his decease by his eldest son,

SIR JAMES LANGHAM (1621-99), 2nd Baronet, who married thrice, but left one daughter only by his first wife Mary, daughter and co-heir of Sir Edward Alston, Knight; namely Mary, wedded to Henry, Earl of Warrington.

Following his decease the title devolved upon his brother,

SIR WILLIAM LANGHAM (c1625-1700), 3rd Baronet, of Walgrave, Sheriff of Northampton, 1672, MP for Northampton, who married thrice, but had issue by his third marriage only (with Martha, daughter of Herbert Hay), a son, his successor,

SIR JOHN LANGHAM (c1670-1747), 4th Baronet, who espoused firstly, Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Sir Thomas Samwell Bt, of Upton, Northamptonshire, and had, with other children,
JAMES &
JOHN, successive baronets;
William, father of JAMES, 7th Baronet.
Sir John married secondly, Maria, eldest daughter of Sir Richard Temple KB, and widow of the Rev Dr West, and had several children.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

SIR JAMES LANGHAM (c1696-1749), 5th Baronet; who died without issue, when the title devolved upon his brother,

SIR JOHN LANGHAM (c1698-1766), 6th Baronet, who transmitted his memory to posterity by placing £6,000 in new South-Sea annuities, in the hands of the Corporation of London, for the purpose of founding a society for the relief of distressed soldiers and sailors, and their families.

Sir John died without issue, when the title devolved upon (the son of his deceased brother, William) his nephew,

SIR JAMES LANGHAM, 7th Baronet.
The heir apparent is the present holder's son, Tyrone Denis James Langham (b 1994).
*****

SIR CHARLES LANGHAM, 13th Baronet, sold the ancestral seat, Cottesbrooke Park, in 1911.

He had married Ethel Tennent in 1893 and they came to live at Tempo Manor, County Fermanagh, which his wife had inherited.

Former seats ~ Cottesbrooke Hall, Northamptonshire; Glyndebourne, East Sussex; Southend, Essex.

Former London residence ~ Langham House, Portland Place.

First published in April, 2014.

Monday, 21 May 2018

Johnstown Kennedy House

THE KENNEDY BARONETS OWNED 1,447 ACRES OF LAND IN COUNTY DUBLIN

DARBY O'KENNEDY (c1648-1745), of Ballykerogue Castle, County Waterford, wedded a daughter of Stephen Baron, of Knockdrumla, and had a son,

JOHN KENNEDY, of Johnstown, County Dublin, who espoused Eleanor, daughter of Eaton Fagan, of Feltrim, and left issue at his decease, 1758, a son and successor,

EDWARD KENNEDY (1746-1811), of Johnstown, who married, in 1781, Sarah, daughter of John Bayly, of Gowran, and had issue,
JOHN, his heir;
Charles Edward, of Peamount.
The elder son,

JOHN KENNEDY (1785-1848), of Johnstown, wedded, in 1819, Maria, daughter of William Bowman, of Rutland Square, Dublin, and had issue,
CHARLES EDWARD BAYLY, his heir;
William;
John;
Francis;
Robert, father of Admiral Francis W Kennedy CB;
Maria.
Mr Kennedy was created a baronet in 1836, denominated of Johnstown Kennedy, County Dublin.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

SIR CHARLES EDWARD BAYLY KENNEDY, 2nd Baronet (1820-80), who espoused, in 1854, Augusta Maria, daughter of Henry Hartstonge Pery, Viscount Glentworth, and had issue,
JOHN CHARLES, his successor;
George Edward de Vere.
Sir Charles was succeeded by his elder son,

SIR JOHN CHARLES KENNEDY, 3rd Baronet, JP DL (1856-1923), of Johnstown, who married, in 1879, Sydney H Maude, daughter of Sir James Macaulay Higginson, and had issue,
JOHN RALPH BAYLY, 4th Baronet;
JAMES EDWARD, 5th Baronet;
Augusta Mabel; Gladys Maude.
Sir John was succeeded by his eldest son,

SIR JOHN RALPH BAYLY KENNEDY, 4th Baronet (1896-1968), of Johnstown, who died unmarried, when the baronetcy devolved upon his brother,

SIR JAMES EDWARD KENNEDY, 5th Baronet (1898-1974), of Johnstown, who died unmarried, when the title reverted to his cousin,

SIR DERRICK EDWARD DE VERE KENNEDY, 6th Baronet (1904-76), of Johnstown, who wedded firstly, in 1926, Phyllis Victoria Levine, daughter of Gordon Fowler; and secondly, in 1945, Barbara Mary Worthing, daughter of William Shepherd, and had issue,
GEORGE RONALD DERRICK, his successor;
Mark Gordon;
Julia Maureen Patricia.
Sir Derrick, former Major, Royal Ulster Rifles, a hotelier from 1947 until 1966, was succeeded by his eldest son,

SIR (GEORGE) RONALD DERRICK KENNEDY, 7th Baronet, OBE (1927-88), who married, in 1949, Noelle Mona, daughter of Charles Henry Green.

The 7th Baronet, Lieutenant-Colonel, Royal Artillery, and was appointed OBE (military) in 1975.

By his wife he had issue,
MICHAEL EDWARD, his successor;
Carolyn Phyllis.
He was succeeded by his son,

SIR MICHAEL EDWARD KENNEDY, 8th Baronet (1956-2012), of Otford, Kent, who wedded, in 1984, Helen Christine Jennifer, daughter of Patrick Lancelot Rae, and had issue,
GEORGE MATTHEW RAE, his successor;
Constance Andrea; Josephine Jennifer; Katherine Colleen.
Sir Michael was succeeded by his son,

SIR GEORGE MATTHEW RAE KENNEDY, 9th Baronet, born in 1993.

The present baronet has not (2013) successfully proven his succession to the baronetcy and is not therefore on the Official Roll of the Baronetage.

However, the case is under review by the Registrar of the Baronetage.


JOHNSTOWN KENNEDY HOUSE, Rathcoole, County Dublin, was a plain, three-storey Georgian house.

It had a three-bay side; with a porch which was enclosed at some later stage.

The drawing-room was notable for its acanthus plasterwork.

It was renowned as having been the residence of Major Sinclair Yeates in the television series, The Irish RM.

The Irish RM  on the tennis court

The estate included a most impressive and extensive range of farm buildings.

The buildings had courtyards with high walls and dramatic gateways some with pinnacles, curved equestrian buildings, Gothicised doorways, a small dairy, and several well-constructed utilitarian buildings serving various agricultural purposes.

There was also a water mill with mill race and a cast-iron mill wheel in-situ.

A roadside forge with horseshoe shaped entrance displays the initials "E K" and the date over the door.

The remains of a later walled garden with ruined greenhouses, a gardener's house and other structures, added a further dimension to this outstanding collection of estate buildings.

Johnstown Kennedy was sold by Sir Derrick Kennedy, 6th Baronet.

The house was subsequently demolished and the estate now forms part of Beech Park Golf Club.

First published in March, 2016.

1st Viscount Charlemont

THE VISCOUNTS CHARLEMONT WERE THE GREATEST LANDOWNERS IN COUNTY ARMAGH, WITH 20,695 ACRES 


The settlement of this noble family in Ireland took place in the reign of ELIZABETH I, when 

THE RT HON SIR TOBY CAULFEILD (1565-1627), a distinguished and gallant soldier, was employed in that part of Her Majesty's dominions against the formidable Hugh O'Neill, Earl of Tyrone.

This gentleman was the son of one Alexander Caulfeild, Recorder of Oxford, who was descended from ancestors of great antiquity and worth settled in that county, and at Great Missenden, Buckinghamshire.

In 1615, Sir Toby was appointed one of the council for the province of Munster.

The next year, 1616, he joined in commission with the Lord Deputy of Ireland (Oliver St John, 1st Viscount Grandison), and others, for parcelling out the escheated lands in Ulster to such British undertakers as were named in the several tables of assignation.

In these employments, The King (JAMES I) found him so faithful, diligent, and prudent, that His Majesty deemed him highly deserving the peerage, and accordingly created him, in 1620, Lord Caulfeild, Baron Charlemont, with limitation of the honour to his nephew, Sir William Caulfeild, Knight.

His lordship died unmarried, in 1627, and was succeeded by the said 

SIR WILLIAM CAULFEILD, 2nd Baron (1587-1640), who took his seat in parliament, 1634, after the Lord Chancellor of Ireland had moved to know the pleasure of the House, whether he should be admitted to this place, having brought neither writ of summons nor patent; whereupon it was resolved that his lordship should be admitted, inasmuch as they were all satisfied that he was a Lord of Parliament.

His lordship, High Sheriff of County Tyrone, 1620, wedded Mary, daughter of Sir John King, Knight (ancestor of the Earls of Kingston), and had issue,
TOBY, his successor;
ROBERT, successor to his brother;
WILLIAM, created Viscount Charlemont;
George;
Thomas;
John;
Anne; Mary; Margaret.
His lordship, Master-General of the Ordnance, 1627-34, was succeeded by his eldest son, 

TOBY, 3rd Baron (1621-42), who also succeeded his late father as Governor of Charlemont Fort, 1640, and there resided with his company of the 97th Regiment of Foot, in garrison.

This fort was a place of considerable strength and importance during the rebellion of 1641; but his lordship suffered himself to be surprised, in that year; and being made prisoner, with his whole family, was subsequently murdered, by the orders, it is said, of Sir Phelim O'Neill.

This unfortunate nobleman, dying unmarried, was succeeded by his brother, 

ROBERT, 4th Baron (1622-42), who died a few months afterwards from an overdose of a prescription of opium, and was succeeded by his next brother,

WILLIAM, 5th Baron (1624-71), who apprehended Sir Phelim O'Neill and had him executed for the murder of his brother, the 3rd Baron.

His lordship having filled, after the Restoration, several high and confidential situations, was advanced to a viscountcy, 1655, as Viscount Charlemont, of County Armagh.

He wedded Sarah, second daughter of Charles, 2nd Viscount Drogheda, and had issue,
WILLIAM, his successor;
Toby;
John;
Mary; Alice; Elizabeth.
His lordship was succeeded by his eldest surviving son,

WILLIAM, 2nd Viscount (c1655-1726); who opposed with zeal the cause of WILLIAM III against JAMES II.


His lordship espoused Anne, daughter of the Most Rev James Margetson, Lord Archbishop of Armagh, by whom he had, with five daughters, five sons to survive infancy, namely,
JAMES, his successor;
Thomas, Governor of Annapolis;
Charles (Rev), Rector of Donaghcary;
John, MP;
Henry Charles.
He died after enjoying the peerage more than half a century, in 1726, and was succeeded by his eldest surviving son,

JAMES, 3rd Viscount (1682-1734), MP for Charlemont, 1703-4, and 1713-26, who married Elizabeth, only daughter of the Rt Hon Francis Bernard, of Castle Mahon, County Cork, one of the judges of the Court of Common Pleas in Ireland, and had issue,
Francis;
JAMES, of whom hereafter;
Alice.
The elder son, Francis, wedded Mary, only daughter of John, Lord Eyre; though was lost, with his lady, infant child, and servant, in a hurricane, during his passage to Ireland from London, in 1775, to fulfil his parliamentary duties as MP for Charlemont.

The Hon Francis Caulfeild left issue, Colonel James Eyre Caulfeild, born in 1765, and Eleanor, who married William, 3rd Earl of Wicklow.

The 3rd Viscount was succeeded by his only surviving son,

JAMES, 4th Viscount (1728-99), KP, who was advanced to an earldom, in 1763, as EARL OF CHARLEMONT.

His lordship wedded, in 1768, Mary, daughter of Thomas Hickman, of Brickhill, County Clare (descended from the noble family of Windsor, Viscounts Windsor, which title became extinct in 1728), and had issue,
FRANCIS WILLIAM, his successor;
James Thomas;
Henry, MP, of Hockley Lodge, Co Armagh;
Elizabeth.
He was a distinguished patriot, and had the honour of commanding-in-chief the celebrated Volunteer Army of Ireland in 1779.


The 1st Earl was a Founder Knight of the Order of St Patrick.

His lordship was succeeded by his eldest son,

FRANCIS WILLIAM, 2nd Earl, KP (1775-1863), who espoused, in 1802, Anne, daughter of William Bermingham, and had issue,
James William, Viscount Caulfeild (1803-23);
William Francis (1805-7);
Maria Melosina; Emily Charlotte.
His lordship died without surviving male issue, when the family honours reverted to his cousin,

JAMES MOLYNEUX, 3rd Earl (1820-92), KP (son of the Hon Henry Caulfeild, second son of 1st Earl), Lord-Lieutenant of County Tyrone, MP for Armagh, 1847-67.

His lordship married twice, though both marriages were without issue, when the earldom and the barony expired, and the remaining peerages devolved upon his kinsman,

JAMES ALFRED, 7th Viscount (1830-1913), CB JP DL, of Loy House, Cookstown, and Drumcairne, County Tyrone,
Captain, Coldstream Guards; fought in the Crimean War; Vice Lord-Lieutenant of County Tyrone, 1868; High Sheriff of County Tyrone, 1868; Comptroller of the Household of the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, 1868-95; Honorary Colonel, 3rd Battalion, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers; Usher of the Black Rod of the Order of St Patrick, 1879-1913.
The 8th Viscount, PC, DL (1880-1949), was elected to the Northern Ireland Parliament as a Senator, where he sat from 1925-37, and was sometime Minister for Education.
James Alfred Caulfeild, 7th Viscount (1830–1913);
James Edward Caulfeild, 8th Viscount; (1880–1949);
Charles Edward St George Caulfeild, 9th Viscount (1887–1962);
Robert Toby St George Caulfeild, 10th Viscount (1881–1967);
Charles St George Caulfeild, 11th Viscount (1884–1971);
Richard St George Caulfeild, 12th Viscount (1887–1979);
Charles Wilberforce Caulfeild, 13th Viscount (1899–1985);
John Day Caulfeild, 14th Viscount Charlemont (1934–2001);
John Dodd Caulfeild, 15th Viscount (b 1966).
The heir apparent is the present holder's son, the Hon Shane Andrew Caulfeild (b 1996).

*****
The Charlemonts were a Patrick family, three members of whom were Knights of St Patrick.

Castle Caulfeild, County Tyrone

Lord Charlemont was the greatest landowner in County Armagh, owning 20,695 acres a century ago.

He also owned almost 6,000 acres in County Tyrone.

During more recent times, the 8th Viscount, PC (NI), DL (1880-1949) was elected to the House of Lords as a Representative Peer; and to the Northern Ireland Parliament as a senator.

He sat in the NI Senate from 1925-37 and was Minister for Education for all but the first of his years.


Lord Charlemont's main country seat, near the village of Moy, County Tyrone, was Roxborough Castle.


The exquisite gates are all that remain.


The Castle was burnt by Irish republicans in 1922.

Charlemont Fort, on the County Armagh side of the river, was burnt in 1920.

Charlemont Fort, with Roxborough Castle in the Background

Subsequently Lord Charlemont lived at another residence, Drumcairne, near Stewartstown in County Tyrone.

It is thought that he eventually moved to the sea-side resort of Newcastle in County Down.


He inherited the titles from his uncle in 1913.

Having no children, the titles passed, on his death, to a cousin.

The 14th Viscount lived in Ontario, Canada and the viscountcy is still extant with the present 15th Viscount Charlemont. 

Earl of Charlemont's arms courtesy of European Heraldry.    First published in December, 2009.